Big update release out of nowhere

So AskWoody.com is reporting that Microsoft has released over 50 security updates out of the blue aimed that fixing the numerous issues stemming from the previous update cycles.  Needless to say that the last couple of months has been disastrous from a patching perspective.

Check out the details here and let us know what you have been experiencing in the environments you’re managing.

Microsoft Exchange 2010

Interesting announcement from Microsoft in that they stated they will extend the end of support date for Exchange Server 2010 from the original January 14, 2020 date to October 13, 2020.

Microsoft provides this as a reason for extending support for this Server product:

Our commitment to meeting the evolving needs of our customers is as strong as ever, and we recognize discontinuing support for a product that has been as popular and reliable as Exchange Server 2010 can be an adjustment.  We also know that some of you are in the midst of upgrades to a newer version of Exchange Server on-premises, or more transformative migrations to the cloud with Office 365 and Exchange Online. With this in mind, we are extending end of support to October 13th 2020 to give Exchange Server 2010 customers more time to complete their migrations. This extension also aligns with the end of support for Office 2010 and SharePoint Server 2010.

Check out the full Tech Community post on Microsoft’s website here for all the details.

Managing Windows 10 Updates Revised

Over the past couple of years, Ed Bott of ZDNet.com has done an awesome job of breaking down how Windows 10 gets updates which is all a part of Microsoft’s new updating philosophy.  To his credit, he has not hesitated when he feels that past practice has changed to the point that the masses should be notified in “layman’s terms” and not “Microsoft speak”.

This has led to all new recommendations on how to approach the installation of optional updates in Windows 10 resulting from the latest version 1903 release.

Even though I may have posted his original piece in a previous post, check out the most updated one here for the full scoop on what’s recommended from here on out.  That is until Microsoft decides to change things yet again!

Speed up Windows 10

So I had a friend of mine ask earlier this week what could be done to maintain a high level of performance or speed up Windows 10 on his office PCs and rattled off numerous suggestions that could help the cause (i.e. keep installed programs to a minimum, have a good amount of available HDD/SSD space, keeping it free of infections, etc.)

It just so happens that as I’m browsing one of my favorite tech news sites, I come across an article detailing the ways that can help a Windows 10 user speed up their PC.

Check it out here and let me know if you see a difference in performance on your PCs!

Time Machine Backups for Windows OSs

While doing some casual browsing about all things tech, I came across a post discussing a software package that can pretty much be looked at as “System Restore” on steroids.  Enter RollBack Rx…it has also been dubbed as the Time Machine Backup-like solution for Windows.

Check out the details here and I’ll be sure to test out the software for myself!

Path to using in-place upgrades for Windows Server OSs

So I believe its safe to assume that all of you Sysadmins out there are as busy as I am with upgrading all of those legacy servers still running 2008 / 2008 R2 in anticipation of the “end of life” (January 14, 2020 to be exact) date soon approaching.

It’s been a heck of a ride thus far but there’s a question that came to mind: Which version of Windows Server are you upgrading to?  2012?  2012 R2?  2016?  2019?

Believe it or not…if you have the time or if it needs to be done out of necessity, Microsoft has published a road map of how to perform in place upgrades (3 to be exact) to get from 2008 (R2 or not) to 2019.

Obviously in a perfect world, you may not want to take this route but if you have no other choice, it may be worth giving this road map (found here) a look!

Also, don’t forget to let us know which version of Windows Server is your final destination… 🙂

“Once a year” Windows 10 feature updates

So it seems that Microsoft has finally gotten the message that it is too burdensome to expect users (especially business ones) to install these large feature updates!

Without taking into account what will happen with “19H2”, it can be expected that Microsoft will release Windows 10 feature updates every Spring and will do away with the fall update.

 

Google Drive vs. Microsoft OneDrive

We’ll I guess we might as well take it a step further with the “rise” of OneDrive by comparing it with the other main competitor in this space, Google Drive.

Ed Bott on ZDNet has the latest comparisons, primarily with a slant on what’s best for a business between these two heavyweights here for all to see!

What’s your pick…OneDrive, Google Drive, or both (in my case)?

The rise of OneDrive

When it comes to cloud storage, many options are available for consumer and business users.  Personally, I use Microsoft OneDrive and Google Drive as my primary cloud storage options so I can appreciate the unbiased article written by Amy Babinchak for AskWoody.com detailing how OneDrive has come a long way in becoming a solid top tier choice for users.

Check out her review here and let me know if you think she is accurate in her assessment!

Starting with SCCM

For those who are looking to get started with SCCM, Doug Seiler (see his blog here) does a great job of breaking it down to the basics and even makes it a fun read when it comes to following the tutorials in order to get your own lab environment up and running.

As someone who has had to do the same and with no formal experience or training, I can truly appreciate someone who has taken the time and effort to put everything in writing!